Tarts

French Pear Tart

If you are holding a dinner to impress, a French Pear Tart for dessert can be the perfect way to do it. It does not only taste superbly to fit the critical taste buds of foodies but it is a sight to behold.

It looks really pretty like a dried large rose in full bloom sitting on a tray. For sure, everyone at the dinner table will think that you have invested too much effort preparing for the dinner.

Print
clock clock icon cutlery cutlery icon flag flag icon folder folder icon instagram instagram icon pinterest pinterest icon print print icon squares squares icon

French Pear Tart


  • Author: Myles
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour
  • Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Yield: 12 servings 1x

Description

If you are looking for something to cook for dessert in some recipe books, your initial reaction must be to skip what you think are hard-to-follow recipes. That must be your reaction if you see a picture of a French pear tart. It really looks amazing and may lead you to think that it may only be baked by someone with excellent baking skills. Browse over this recipe and think again.


Scale

Ingredients

Crust:

1.5 cups of all-purpose flour

5 tablespoons of sugar

½ teaspoon of salt

12 tablespoons of unsalted butter, melted

Filling:

8 large pieces of pears

3 tablespoons of unsalted butter

1 tablespoon of water

¾ cup of fig preserves

¼ teaspoon of salt


Instructions

  1. Place one oven rack in the middle with the second rack at the top slot. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Mix flour, sugar, and salt in a bowl. Add melted butter and combine to make the dough.
  3. Transfer dough to a 9-inch tart springform pan. Press dough down to spread on the bottom and onto the rims of the pan using your hands.
  4. Use the middle rack of the oven to bake until crust turns golden brown or for approximately 30 minutes. Remove pan from oven and let it cool. Leave oven on.
  5. Heat the fig preserves in a microwave for about 40 seconds. Pour heated fig preserves through a strainer to separate chunks from the liquid.
  6. Slice five pears into ½-inch slices. Remove the core.
  7. In a large cast-iron skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of butter. Toss in pear slices and 1 tablespoon of water. Cover and cook over medium heat for about 3 minutes or until pears are slightly tender. Transfer pears into a large platter and let them cool.
  8. Cut the remaining 3 pears in the same manner.
  9. In the previously used cast iron skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of butter. Toss in newly-sliced pears, chunks of fig reserves, and salt. Cook covered over medium heat for ten minutes, stirring occasionally until pears are very tender.
  10. Mash the pears and fig preserves into a puree using a potato masher. Cook until the pureed mixture reduces and thickens for approximately 5-7 minutes.
  11. Pour pear-fig puree on top of the now cooled crust; spread evenly.
  12. Arrange the cooled pear slices in layered circles, starting at the outer edges.
  13. Bake in 350-degree F-heated oven for 30 minutes by placing tart on the second rack of the oven.
  14. Warm the strained liquid fig preserves for 20 seconds in the microwave.
  15. Remove tart from the oven after 30 minutes and brush the pears with the warmed fig liquid.
  16. Return the tart to the oven and place it on the top rack. Broil very briefly until pears have that caramelized appearance.
  17. Let it cool for at least 1 ½ hours before removing it from the springform pan.
  18. You can now slice and serve.

Notes

  • You can top your French Pear Tart with cinnamon powder, blueberries, or even pecans.

After reading the instructions, you may realize that baking French Pear Tart is easy after all. It does not require you to be doing many things like beating, mixing, or anything that can take much effort. What can be more important is to be attentive at the cooking time.

Indeed, we may miss on some delectable recipes that are easy-to-prepare because we often look at the number of ingredients and the instructions. If there are numerous on the list, we may think that it is hard to do or it may be expensive. The pictures can also deceive us. Who would think that this French pear tart is easy to do after seeing its picture?